© The Frick Collection
In 1999, the holdings of The Frick Collection were substantially expanded by the bequest of twenty-five clocks and fourteen watches from the estate of celebrated New York collector Winthrop Kellogg Edey. This small but exceptionally fine collection illustrates both the stylistic and the technical development of clocks and watches from around 1500 to 1830.
© The Frick Collection
Henry Clay Frick's collection of Limoges enamels reveals the broad range of applications to which this brilliant but delicate medium was applied in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century France—from secular objects, such as portraits, a casket, and tableware, to objects of religious association, such as devotional triptychs. The majority of enamels in the Collection originally come from the estate of J. Pierpont Morgan (1837–1913) and were purchased by Frick in 1916. The following year, Frick converted his first-floor office into a French Renaissance-style gallery to showcase his newly-acquired collection of Limoges enamels. Today, the space is known as the Enamels Room and houses several of Frick's enamels, alongside bronzes, paintings, and ceramics of the Italian Renaissance.
© The Frick Collection
The range of furniture in The Frick Collection is typical of a grand New York residence at the beginning of the twentieth century; a comparable variety of periods and places of origin could be found among the furniture in J. P. Morgan's house and library. Henry Clay Frick brought together French, Italian, and English furniture of the Renaissance to the nineteenth century, choosing examples that complemented his painting and sculpture collections. The historical pieces he acquired were interspersed with furniture designed and made especially for the house by its architects and interior designers.
© The Frick Collection
The majority of Henry Clay Frick's decorative arts collection was acquired during the 1914 to 1918 campaign to furnish 1 East 70th Street, after the collector and his family had moved into their new residence. Among the objects acquired by Frick are several remarkable pieces of eighteenth-century French gilt bronze, including andirons, candelabra, and vases. The Collection holds several superb examples of monochrome Chinese vases adorned with French gilt-bronze mounts — objects combining the eighteenth-century vogue for Asian porcelains with a taste for elaborate gilt decoration.
© The Frick Collection
© The Frick Collection

Most of the sculptures purchased by Henry Clay Frick were from the Italian Renaissance. Notable in the Collection are works by Vecchietta, Laurana, Francesco da Sangallo, Antonio Pollaiuolo, Riccio, and Severo da Ravenna. Frick's earliest purchases of French sculpture seem to have been chosen to fit in with the decorative schemes of the house. Evidently, the first sculpture he bought, in 1914, was the Lemoyne Garden Vase for the interior courtyard; later he obtained remarkable works by Coysevox, Houdon, and Clodion. A number of splendid early North European sculptures are also in the Collection, above all the bust of the Duke of Alba by Jonghelinck, the Multscher reliquary bust, and bronzes traditionally ascribed to Adriaen de Vries and Hubert Gerhard.
© The Frick Collection
The Frick Collection has seven silver-gilt wine coolers, several of which are usually on display in the Dining Room. These objects represent the English silversmith work of William Pitts (1768–1818), Benjamin and James Smith (partners from 1809 to 1812), and Paul Storr (1771–1844). Another highlight of the Collection is an exquisite silver-gilt écuelle by the London-based silversmith Paul de Lamerie (1688–1751), also typically on view in the Dining Room.
© The Frick Collection
The small but impressive collection of textiles includes, most notably, two magnificent carpets from the court of the Mughal emperors and two eighteenth-century tapestries by Peter van den Hecke depicting scenes from Don Quixote.
© The Frick Collection
The Frick Collection includes forty exceptionally fine drawings by such masters as Pisanello, Altdorfer, Rubens, Claude, Rembrandt, Greuze, Gainsborough, Stubbs, Goya, Redouté, Ingres, Corot, Degas, and Whistler. Included in the impressive group of fifty-nine prints are four superb impressions by Dürer, three engravings by Van Dyck, eleven of Rembrandt's most celebrated etchings and drypoints, thirteen of Meryon's pivotal Etchings of Paris, twelve Whistler prints comprising the First Venice Set, and twelve eighteenth-century English reproductive portrait prints.3